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. shirley anne jackson, president of windsler polly technic institute since 199 . she served as the chair of the u.s. nuclear regulatory commission. she also has had an extensive career working in several prestigious physics laboratories, researching subatomic particles. dr. jackson earned her ph.d. in theoretical elementary particle physics from m.i.t. our final witness is dr. charles vest, president of the national academy of engineering. he was elected to this position in 2007 and is serving a six-year term. dr. vest also is the president emeritus of the massachusetts institute of technology and earned his ph.d. in mechanical engineering from the university of michigan. prior to his time in the academic world, dr. vest was vice chair of the u.s. council of competitiveness for eight years and a member of the president's committee of advisors on science and technology during the bush and clinton administrations. both dr. vest and dr. jackson were also distinguished members of the panel that authored the original 2005 national academy study "rising above the gathering storm." this study r
texas, ms. jackson lee, for five minutes. ms. jackson lee: i ask unanimous consent to revise and extend. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. ms. jackson lee: mr. speaker, i have always had such great respect for this distinguished body. the holder and interpreter of democracy. the institution that proudly protects the constitution that was written by those who saw in this land this bright and shining sun, from sea to shining sea, enormous opportunity for freedom. so many people came to this nation and they came in many different ways. we don't carry the way we came into the future as much as the fact that we are grateful of the opportunity that this nation has given us. the nation has been able to turn the tide on embracing democracy in its fullest because of the constitution and the laws because we adhere to the three branches of government. so although my ancestors came to this nation in bondage and lasted for hundreds of years, slavery that has its remnants continuously as we move throughout society. there are now laws that can ensure no matter how you came to this country, n
. >> after president-elect andrew jackson's wife died in december of 1828, her niece, emily donaldson, assumed the role of first lady. >> emily was perfect. for all the negatives washington had to say about andrew jackson, they loved emily. and she sort of covered everything. she was the women all liked her. and as it happened, the women's opinions meant more than people thought in washington. but she -- emily became the -- his acting first lady. she entertained beautifully. she was polished. some people thought she's from the country. she knew exactly how do things. >> emily donaldson, one of the women who served as first lady in c-span's new series, "first ladies, influence and image. in a first of its kind project tore television, season one begin this is monday, presidents' day, at 9:00 p.m. eastern and pacific. c-span, c-span radio, and c-span.org. >> we have had a habit in this country if i may say this now of glossing over presidents. we decided, some people, they are bald eagles and they all have to be treated as if they are symbols of the country. what that means, though, is
trip abroad as secretary of state. earlier today, former rep jesse jackson pleaded guilty to using $750 million in campaign money for personal use. an attorney for the former congressman spoke briefly with reporters out of the district court. here's a look. >> obviously this has been a very difficult morning for all of us who care about jesse jackson. it was a morning that had become. those in court saw that he did precisely that. he had to come to terms for conduct for the people that care about him. the process that begins now is about explaining that conduct. the way we will do it, it will not be on the courthouse steps. it will not be on over winfrey, no offense to oprah winfrey. it will be with lawyers, court documents, evidence, witnesses, and arguments. i hope you all respect that. there is reason for optimism. a man that talented and devoted to public service, who has done so much for so many, there will be another chapter in the life of jesse jackson. a chapter for the people that care about us. i will answer a question i have seen many times. the turns out that he had serious
to the gentlewoman from texas, ms. jackson lee. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman from texas is recognized for two minutes. ms. jackson lee: my friend from massachusetts is absolutely right. what most america is waiting for is for us to address the very abyss that we put ourselves in, the cliff we put ourselves in. the fact that we became hostage to this idea of a commission that was necessary because we could not get members on both sides of the aisle to be able to work together on what should be cut. that's why my friends on the other side of the aisle had members who did not understand how government function. republicans did not understand that congress is a rainy day umbrella, this we are supposed to serve the america people. people can say that rome is burning or the cities and towns of economy are asking us to finally answer the question. under the laws that we adhere to, the president has a right to submit his budget. that should be very clore. no legislation here on the floor is going to dictate the president's budget. there is a law that is supposed to be said the first monday in
look at the successes and misses of the federal government. andrew jackson bred horses. maybe not as public as somebody like herbert hoover. rutherford hayes fought for education for blacks and whites. presidents today to a lot of on nonprofits. they work to make changes they think they could not or would not make as presidents. they use the platform later and perform these duties. host: there is a debate happening on twitter. this is an individual saying this. people are talking about this as we take a look at the benefits and perks presidents are getting after they leave office on this presidents day. we go to doris next. caller: a great program. givene first lady's analysts after their husbands leave office? guest: former first ladies do not receive anything until they are widows. widows are authorized to be provided 20,000 lives a year in benefits after their husband passes away as long as they do not marry. if they remarry, they lose those benefits. currently, there is no way to accepting the $20,000. in order to accept it, you have to not accept any other pension. you wo
. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentlelady from texas rise? so ordered. ms. jackson lee: a group that we don't hear a lot about because they have no voting rights are children. on friday, march 1, our children will be in the eye of the storm for a sequester that will occur, will impact children, particularly head start. so many of my head start on the nations have cried out for the leaf, title 1 funding. i say to them, we are going to come together. it may not be on friday. but we know we're going to look forward to overturn what has been a process that was put in place because president obama and the democrats were ready to make sure the government was going to run and others were not. now we have a crisis. but that crisis will not last long because we democrats will put children first and find a solution to ensure that the american people have the resources that are necessary to provide services to ensure the quality of life that their tax dollars pay for. we must have revenue and yes, we must have spending responsibility but we cannot undermine the american people. i
of that we will be honoring rosa parks in statuary hall tomorrow. and i would like to thank jesse jackson. without his efforts every single day, every week pushing to have that statue done, it would not be in that hall tomorrow honoring her. i need to give credit. appreciate the moment to say that. i look forward to working with her as we implement the programs' regulations. with that i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. the gentlewoman from michigan. mrs. miller: mr. speaker, first of all i would like to associate myself with the remarks about rosa parks. my ranking member just made. think about one person with that act of courage literally changing the nation. it's a remarkable thing. we were very proud in michigan that she came to be a resident of michigan in her final years where she served, as you can imagine, so extraordinarily well and inspired so many people. certainly entirely appropriate that her statue to her takes place in statuary hall monks presidents and other -- amongst presidents and other national leaders. we are lookin
american politics." let's hear from jackson, mississippi, jason, republican caller. caller: thank you. there was a couple of really somewhat offensive and i think probably logical fallacies that occurred and i need further explanation so do the listeners. when the claim was state add few moments ago about the title 5 in saying that it's, quote, clearly needed, an example of that, for instance, more than 50% of white voters in mississippi voted for president obama. that's a logical fallacy. the claim doesn't support the supposition. the question would really be, what is the proof then without sort of the biases, the nature of political bias, for these claims. the heritage fellow stated that real claims are against, for instance, alabama, haven't been present or credible. i really don't understand why it's sort of making me feel like i'm listening to a radio show from the 1950's when in fact it was 2013. host: mr. berman for a response. guest: you look for example at a town in mississippi, in 2001 it was a majority black town. but the governing board, the mayor and city council, was all
argued about it. there was a second bank of the united states that was created. andrew jackson basically ended its charter. there's a long history of mistrust in parts of the united states about the central bank and what it does. back in the jefferson and hamilton days, a lot of the farm state bankers did not trust the first bank of the united states. there is a federal reserve board in washington made up of seven governors and chairman who is ben bernanke. then there are 12 regional fed banks. they're all part of this federal reserve system. the regional fed bank, every chartered bank of the united states has to pay in capital to the federal reserve banks and in return they get a dividend. but these are not banks the way we think of commercial banks. the federal reserve bank of new york is not like citigroup out there trying to earn big profits to return to shareholders. their job is to manage the money supply. it is also to be a lender of last resort in a crisis, which is what the federal reserve did in 2007. when there is a run on a bank, when depositors flee the banking system becaus
. the clerk: leave of absence requested for mr. culberson of texas for today, and ms. jackson lee of texas for today. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the requests are granted. under the speaker's announced policy of january 3, 2013, the gentleman from arizona, mr. franks, is recognized for 60 minutes as the designee of the majority leader. mr. franks: i thank you, mr. speaker. mr. speaker, my comments today are heavily contribute to from author of the nature of war, ron tyra. i want to acknowledge him. he's a noted military expert, noted national security expert, and i appreciate so very much his seminal contribution to these comments. mr. speaker, a nuclear iran poses a severe and unfamiliar risk to the united states and its allies. we have to be very careful not to mistakenly assume that a relatively stable balance of deterrence, similar to the nuclear equilibrium between the united states and the soviet union during the cold war can be achieved with iran. a nuclear iran represents a very different type of threat that simply cannot be managed. a nuclear iran would serve to in
jackson. please stand and be recognized. [applause] i want to turn the podium back over to senator george mitchell. >> years ago, when bob dole, howard baker, tom daschle, and i gathered to establish the bipartisan by -- bipartisan policy center, we were dismayed to the extent to which our political process appeared to be in gridlock as a consequence of excessive partisanship and ideological posturing. that concern is heightened today. i frequently cite the example of the presidential campaign of 1800 when jefferson supporters called president adams a hermaphrodite, lacking, they said, the strength of a man or the gentleness of a woman. supporters said that its jefferson were elected, robbery, rape, and murder would be openly taught and practiced in our country. it was rough and tough when we were there, but it has gotten proper and tupper today. we at the bipartisan policy center believe it is possible that men and women with strongly held different political philosophies can come together in good faith to try and deal in a responsible way through principled compromise with the major pro
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12